When we started out with our unschooling journey, we felt a little like knights in shining armor freeing ourselves from our own self-imposed shackles. Hence the name of the blog.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Antony & Cleopatra, Z's body paint and A Raghu-Bat-Mobile etc...

Mom is watching BBC's production of Antony and Cleopatra. For those of you who like me have forgotten our school's interpretation of this play... there is a blurb pasted below. Raghu is following along and i can hear his half-hearted at times and whole-hearted at times involvement in the histrionics that are so vivid and loudly expressed at times in this play.

Meanwhile raghu also made a lego bat-mobile... invented after he noticed a picture of it on the lego website... and also noticing that he may nto have all the parts that lego woudl ahve you believe you need to make one. So there you go....

Also Zoya decided to paint her body... she is wont to do this everytime the paper in front of her is full :-)





And Raghu drew something that looked like heiroglyphics on the chalk board... and then explained that it is the path he took while jumping off the dress-up chest :-) So the semi circle on top is the chest. The vertical lines are where he jumped. Then the dots are where he bounced off the ground. The horizontal line is the giant shoe tongue that he had to jump over. A self made obstacle run.




I am proud to declare that i finished the bath-puppet-glove for my neice, Maya. Yahoo!

info:: Antony and Cleopatra is a play by William Shakespeare, often considered a tragedy, although this is debated. It was originally printed in the First Folio of 1623.

The plot is based or thought to be on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Markus Antonius and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumvirs and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterized by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome. Many consider the role of Cleopatra in this play one of the most complex female roles in Shakespeare's work.[1] She is frequently vain and histrionic, provoking an audience almost to scorn; at the same time, Shakespeare's efforts invest both her and Antony with tragic grandeur. These contradictory features have led to famously divided critical responses.[2]

1 comment:

Steph said...

Halloo! Finally visiting and leaving a comment after being lame all this time. The kids are looking good; I'm enjoying all the fun pictures of pickles and bath gloves and whatnot :D Everything is cool on this end; my stepson started college a couple of weeks ago, and is ever so slowly inching his way toward complete self-sufficiency. Curtis and I love having him around, but hopefully he'll leave the nest before he turns 30 :P